Innovation and Intellectual Property Protection Will Drive Green Job Creation

            Many of Advocacy’s studies over its history have focused on how small businesses, as well as entrepreneurs of all demographic groups, contribute to job creation and economic growth through innovative technologies (see, for example, the study released this week on High-tech Immigrant Entrepreneurship in the United States.

            At a recent National Economists Club meeting, Dr. Robert Shapiro, chair of the ecoIdea Institute, discussed economic growth and its relationship to energy independence. He notes that the pace of innovation seems to be accelerating and asks why. “Part of it is science,” he notes. “This is a period of breakthroughs in genomics and computer science in particular. Part of it is the implications and applications of the enormous advances in information technologies. We can figure out things that before we never had the techniques and person power to take on. And part of it is globalization, which gives almost any organization access to much of the global pool of human capital.”

       If, as climate science implies, there is an urgent need to curtail greenhouse gas emissions, he suggests that “the intersection of climate and economic policy lies in innovation.” He further notes that “the development and spread of particular innovations such as breakthrough nanotechnology-based solar applications…depend on the prospect of securing the returns from others’ use of those innovations… That means that we cannot separate preserving the climate and driving economic growth from protecting intellectual property rights since those rights are the essential basis for those returns.”

            Food for thought. The full presentation podcast is located here.

— Kathryn Tobias, Senior Editor

6 Comments
  1. Amrita says

    Hi!

    Yes, I have read that Greenhouse gas emissions threaten to attack the most basic systems that are at the root of all economic productivity – food, soil, fresh water, human health, and stable communities. Building a green economy that transforms how we produce and use energy will definitely help us. Investing in new technology will access abundant domestic sources of renewable energy. This will also increase economic productivity, boost the skills and incomes workers, and leave a legacy of productive public infrastructure that enables long-term innovation and growth.

    With Regards
    Amrita

  2. Acai Berry says

    Well, Building a green economy that transforms how we produce and use energy will definitely help us. Investing in new technology will access abundant domestic sources of renewable energy. This will also increase economic productivity, boost the skills and incomes workers, and leave a legacy of productive public infrastructure that enables long-term innovation and growth.

  3. Department of Agriculture says

    Thanks for the link to the podcast, I am hoping it will be interesting. I agree with this article in the sense that as we look at growing as an economy, we need to consider how that growth will impact the economy. The closer we can align our growth while diminishing our impact on the environment.

  4. web hosting reviews says

    I would think that the most obvious thing to do would be to scale down our need of electricity at the same time as scaling up our capacity to generate renewable energy. A big factor here is the ‘Green Energy’ concept.

  5. Carinsurance Decatur says

    Private industry will eventually come up with the way to drive green technology and job growth. Unfortunately, there aren’t too many young people that want to become scientists any more.

    Let’s hope government backs such positive technological efforts and does not hide behind the coat tails of big oil industry

  6. daniel mackelburg says

    china is getting ready to jump completely on the green bandwagon, USA is turning to green too. but i believe we are too late to make a difference

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